Tag Archives: Drainage

READY ON THE RIGHT ? READY ON THE LEFT ?

STAND DOWN!!
All is not ready on the firing line. The firing line being the bridge at Regency Heritage Park.
If standing on the bridge leading to William Collier Elementary School

Under the bridge peaking out of the garbage from the trolls point point of view

Under the bridge peaking out of the garbage from the trolls point point of view


and looking down range, to the southeast on the right (the side the school is on), is a MS4 channel “Municipal Separate Stormwater Sewer Systems” or storm drain or System designed or used to collect or convey stormwater (including storm drains, pipes, ditches, etc.) leading to Grand Avenue which collects stormwater from the mountains to the south of the park.
Approaching Grand Ave.

Approaching Grand Ave.


Another look towards Grand Ave.

Another look towards Grand Ave.


Looking back towards the park

Looking back towards the park


It also collects run-off from the rural area between Grand Ave, Union St. as far south as Sheila Lane
Heading towards Grand Ave and Sheila Ln.

Heading towards Grand Ave and Sheila Ln.


While standing in the same spot if one looks to the left (up the hill towards the houses) is a flood channel coming off of Palomar Street.
Looking towards Palomar St.

Looking towards Palomar St.


Another look towards Palomar St.

Another look towards Palomar St.


The channels are on property owned by Riverside County EDA and listed as part of the City of Wildomar’s drainage system on the Santa Margarita River Watershed MS4 Facilities Map.
If one looks straight ahead towards the end of the park one sees what I have referred to as the “Rabbit Hole”
The rabbit hole, discharge point from Bryant St. Drain Stage 1

The rabbit hole, discharge point from Bryant St. Drain Stage 1


Which is owned and maintained by Riverside County Flood Control and Water Conservation District RCFC&WCD which collects run-off from as far south and east as Mission Trail, Bryant St. and the pit called Marna O’Brien Park.
All three of these systems combine to bring you
After only 3/4 of an inch of rain had fallen overnight.

After only 3/4 of an inch of rain had fallen overnight.


Sedco Bryant St. Drainage  from hills west of Grand Ave. after 3/4 of an inch of rain.

Sedco Bryant St. Drainage from hills west of Grand Ave. after 3/4 of an inch of rain.


Unnamed channel from Palomar after 3/4 of an inch of rain.

Unnamed channel from Palomar after 3/4 of an inch of rain.


With the current condition of the bridge trolls housing we end up with this
Water accumulated before the bridge to the school. Poor Bridge Troll

Water accumulated before the bridge to the school. Poor Bridge Troll


Which leaves behind this
All the sediment in the channel will end up here once again

All the sediment in the channel will end up here once again


After many man hours countless thousands of dollars and months later it still looks like this on Opening Day.
The morning of opening day. Work on the parks began in October of 2013

The morning of opening day. Work on the parks began in October of 2013

When Mother Nature pulls the trigger and releases her next load of measurable rain down range the City of Wildomar will not be ready on the firing line

Rumination for March 4, 2014

While attending a meet and greet on Friday February 28th at City Hall one of the Wildomar City Council members present was bragging about standing on a piece of property which will one day house a sandwich shop and strip mall commenting about how dry it was, the drainage was just fine and there was no signs of flooding.
I got a big chuckle at that statement because.
At that very moment not a block away Bundy Canyon Road was a torrential river with a flow path that varied with every car the passed due to the movement of rocks and dirt when they drove done the road.
If pressed on the issue this council person would tell you that when constructed the new business would build a retention basin.
The problem being that this retention basin would only filter pollutants and sediments from that parcel and modulate the INCREASED flow created by this development. It would not correct the existing deficiencies that already exist due to the County of Riverside and the City of Wildomar’s failure in providing for a proper drainage system.
This deficiency was originally foisted upon County Flood Control without proper Developer Impact fees being collected by the County of Riverside, a practice continued for 6 years under LOCAL CONTROL by a City Council that neglected to adjust the Impact Fees when Wildomar became a city.
To add insult to injury the Developer Impact Study which was completed almost 2 years before the City Council adopted the new fees are wholly inadequate to address the drainage issue. The Colgan Study recommended a fee of $1,749.51 per 1,000 gross square feet of development for this type of development and what finally adopted was $911.00 per 1,000 sq. ft.
This council person will sit there and complain about lawsuits which have delayed this project while totally ignoring what everyone around that project has faced for years and will continue to face in ever increasing frequency for many more years to come.