Category Archives: History

WILDOMAR’S VERY OWN RAINMAKER

The prescient prognosticators of Wildomar seem to have a clog in the synaptic cleft causing the nerve impulses to wander into the stratosphere of the imagination.

In the Measure Z Oversight Advisory Committee “independent audit” the rainmaker relived an out of body experience explained below.

Park rehab activities at Regency – Heritage park sustained significant damage during an afternoon spring storm in which over 5 inches of rain was received in 2 hours on the freshly planted slopes. The park is part of the County flood control system and acts as a storm drain channel. With the severity of the storm and micros bursts, the channel was inundated with debris which has hampered the parks timely restoration.

Freshly Planted?, the Great Day of Service was held on October 26, 2013. This rain event sounds about as fictional as the narrative provided the League of Cities.
http://www.cacities.org/Member-Engagement/Helen-Putnam-Awards/California-City-Solutions/2014/Great-Day-of-Service-City-of-Wildomar
In which it was claimed $100,000 in donations was raised. (Only if one counts the “anonymous donor”, not, as even with the 40K promised this fell far short of 100K.

The first month with days in the spring season.

The first month with days in the spring season.

This audit is for the 2013-2014 fiscal year with the parks reopening on April 12, 2014.
In most north temperate zone locations, spring months are March, April and May, with spring beginning technically on March 20, 2014 and ending on June 20, 2014.

The month the parks opened shows just under a quarter of an inch

The month the parks opened shows just under a quarter of an inch


The bulk of Aprils rainfall, .200 fell on the 24th and 25th of the month.

Using the data available from WeatherCurrents.com for Wildomar which has a weather station which is located in the City of Wildomar near Durango Ct. and Union St, this places the weather station 3200 feet or 6 tenths of a mile as the crow flies from Regency Heritage Park and 2000 feet from Marna O’Brien one finds this statement to be complete fabrication of someones extremely vivid imagination as the whole rainfall season for 2013-2014 shows less half of the stated rainfall of one micro burst.
Seasonal Rainfall
Like “Punxsutawney Phil” (who was dropped on his head or “Concord Charlie” maybe even the lastest to join “Mojave Maxine” these predictions while fun to hear are about as accurate as shooting spit-wads in a hurricane.

Another bit of fiction in the claim is that Regency Heritage Park is a part of the County Flood system. Although there is an enormous volume of water channeled towards this park only a standard 10 foot wide easement for the free flow of water exist in county records.

MORE FALSE PROMISES FROM WILDOMAR

The notion that parks are really important to this community could not be further from the truth.

Wildomar City Officials

Wildomar City Officials

Looking over the calendar for upcoming meetings in the city one can’t help wondering when the Measure Z Oversight Committee is going meet again to approve the seriously delinquent “Independent Audit”.
Hint: In the past the have met on the 4th Thursday of the month which would make the next meeting take place on January 22, 2015.
Starting on January 15, 2015 two positions should have been advertised in the local newspaper as these positions are becoming vacant.

Resolution 2013-37

Resolution 2013-37

And added surprise to the citizens of Wildomar will be the highly esteemed Standing Committee on Parks which will be meeting on January 26, 2015 usually held at 6:30 pm at City Hall. You might hear about it around January 21st.

A fine addition to the proposed Gateway Park at Malaga and Mission Trail would be this statue.

Right on the corner under the Welcome to Wildomar Sign would be a good spot.

Right on the corner under the Welcome to Wildomar Sign would be a good spot.

SIDEWALK SUPER an AGE OLD TRADITION

An idea dating back to the depression era which encouraged laymen to observe and offer critique of construction being performed throughout the country.

Super1

Be that as it may, modern contractors do recognize the value of having sidewalk superintendents on their jobs. Observers of construction work have, from time to time, offered worthwhile suggestions as to how difficult operations could be simplified.

Sidewalk superintendents perform an important function in spreading information concerning construction work of vital importance. Many times they build up the morale of workmen on the job who realize that their efforts are being viewed and appreciated.

Super2

Herald Statesman, Mar. 10, 1954. This jokey “Sidewalk Superintendents Club” thing dated to the 1930s, according to a story Jan Morris tells in Manhattan ’45. One day when Rockefeller Center was being built, John D. Rockefeller, Jr. decided to look in on the construction incognito. A foreman on the site saw him, did not recognize him, and ejected him. The incident gave Rockefeller the idea to build a viewer’s platform so that people could watch the construction. It was facetiously presented as a Sidewalk Superintendents Club, and in the very beginning, even had some of the trappings of a club. It was a viewing platform in front of a wall with peepholes, including peepholes close to the ground for future superintendents, children.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=88KSY3T-t2w

Super3

A New Idea
Hardly, this is an excerpt from an article from the “Official journal of the Division of Highways,
Department of Public Works, State of California” Volume 31 May-June 1952 Page 17 (link below will take you there)

http://libraryarchives.metro.net/DPGTL/Californiahighways/chpw_1952_mayjun.pdf

A year ago the Guy F. Atkinson Company, contractor on the $3,500,000 bridge over the Arroyo Seco for the Colorado Freeway, took a big step forward and built a sidewalk superintendents’ house at a vantage point on the job. This building measures 20 feet by 30 feet and has wide windows on all sides so that construction activities can be easily viewed. In the center there is a model of the bridge structure on a scale of 1 inch equals 20 feet so that sidewalk superintendents, after viewing disconnected units of construction out on the site, can look at the model and see how the various parts will fit together in the final product. Mr. Atkinson believes this model is of value not only to sidewalk superintendents but also to his own workmen who frequently come in to look at it in order to more easily interpret the plans. By visualizing the completed structure as shown by the model, they can then work out intricate details of form construction more easily.

KTTV, Channel 11 program “Sidewalk Superintendents,” 25 minutes of program time between 1 and 1.30 p.m. Mondays through Fridays. The first broadcast was made on April 1, 1952 with Resident Engineer Ray Collins being interviewed by Producer Roy Maypole while the camera was showing’ construction scenes on the Hollywood Freeway.

Super5

Come on Wildomar, get out there and supervise away. Fun for all ages.
Super6
Super7

WHAT DROUGHT ?

Posted are two pictures of the same spot in town. It is located on a major roadway. Many would consider it “THE ROADWAY” that defines Wildomar as it runs completely across it from southeast to northwest, spanning tract homes to rural estates, it is sometimes referred to by other names such as the emigrant trail, Old Highway 395, Highway 71, etc.

P11-24-14_11.55

This section of roadway has a modern multi-use trail complete with a fence separating it from the sidewalk (No parkway) sidewalk butted up against a curb of a proposed future 6 lane scenic highway, a planted engineered hillside complete with waterfall.

P03-20-14_09.33

It also has the distinction of being maintained by a landscape company contracted by the city of Wildomar through a Community Service Area (CSA) who’s responsibility it is to clean and weed the trail, maintain the fence in good repair, change out the filters in the storm drain along with reporting to the city public works department anything that may be in need of repair not in their contract all paid for with your tax dollar.
The difference between the two pictures in ONE MONTH AND A DAY.

P12-25-14_09.50

This water leak has saturated one side of the trail and spilled across the sidewalk into a storm drain for a least that long.
This trail is used daily by walkers, joggers, horseback riders (a evidenced by the occasional clue left behind, from the behind)and for over a month not one call has been placed to the city officials or the water district by a resident or the landscaping company contracted to do so.

Notice the fence in need of repair. Hope there is not a fire as it appears this hydrant is the culprit of the leak.

Notice the fence in need of repair. Hope there is not a fire as it appears this hydrant is the culprit of the leak.

Just maybe everyone is waiting to make the news when this vital roadway disappears into a giant sinkhole.

Is this the future

Is this the future

I guess as a resident living several miles from this section of road it will be up to me to report this water leak in time of a drought. (Why haven’t I done so as of yet, call it an experiment). If the leak had been larger I might have.
Interesting addition if one googles this spot it shows a picture from June 2014 where the wetness can be observed.

A LITTLE OLD DUMP ? IN WILDOMAR ?

Although closed in October of 1953 this site is formerly known as the Bundy Canyon Sanitary III Landfill. It is unknown how long this site operated as a dump but aerial photos from 1938 show a relatively undisturbed area.

Vicinity

Since that time it has been used primarily as decomposed granite borrow pit for the Riverside County Transportation Department.
(“Borrow pit” means any place on a lot or parcel of land where dirt, soil, clay, decomposed granite or other similar material is removed by excavation or otherwise for any purpose other than surface mining operations or a grading project with off-site transport. (www.codepublishing.com/CA/SantaClarita/html/…/SantaClarita1711.html )

Anyone who has driven Bundy Canyon Road has more than like seen this facility as it has been there for years behind the locked gates where one on occasion sees the orange trucks owned by the County of Riverside.

Front Gate off of Bundy

Front Gate off of Bundy

On March 13, 2013 the city of Wildomar, by 5-0 vote of the city council, leased a portion of this facility, for a period of 5 years, to be used as a municipal corporate yard and for special events for a sum of $1.00 per year.

One of the Rotary BBQ’s was held here in April of 2013.

A birds eye view.

A birds eye view.

It’s kind of funny how in the lease agreement, the County of Riverside description of this property, it is claimed, that the County of Riverside Transportation Department owns a 40 acre parcel along Bundy Canyon Road within the City of Wildomar which is utilized for a materials and storage yard. (See Legal Description below) There is no mention of its former life as a local dump. There is also no mention of this fact in the staff report prepared by City of Wildomar Staff when this item went before the City Council.

The parcel in question is 366-300-079 located at 22800 Bundy Canyon Road. In the County of Riverside LEGAL DESCRIPTION: RECORDED BOOK/PAGE: MB 10/58
SUBDIVISION NAME: SEDCO TRACT 1
LOT/PARCEL: 174
The size of this parcel is listed as 85.78 acres not the 40 acres stated by the County of Riverside in its staff report presented the Board of Supervisors on March 20, 2013.
Looking further into the history of this site one finds that in an “Initial Assessment Report for the widening of Bundy Canyon Road completed in June of 2007, a regulatory records search was conducted during which it was determined the location of this facility was incorrectly noted.
(The closed landfill is located within the boundaries of the currently existing Bundy Canyon surface mine. The location of the landfill is approximately 700 east of Canyon Ranch Road and 700 feet north of Bundy Canyon Road as noted in a state database.)

For those interested in seeing an excellent photographic history of Bundy Canyon Road including the first hint of a freeway starting as early as 1967 you can visit http://www.cityofwildomar.org/uploads/files/environmental/Bundy-Canyon-Phase-I-061507.pdf

Page 69 is the beginning of the historical photographs starting in 1994 going back to 1938. The first photograph of each year contains the site of the former dump as well as the location of the 15 freeway.

LEMON STREET IS NOT A STORM DRAIN

Despite the wishful thinking of City Officials or the lack of caring in the past on the part of the County of Riverside for those rural residents living downstream of the numerous tract homes built over the years a failure to move forward on required facilities has turned Lemon Street into a storm drain collecting waters from an area approximately 3/4 of a mile east of the freeway to well past Mission Trail/Palomar on into the Lake at Elsinore.
All the water that falls according to Riverside County Flood Control & Water Conservation District (RCFC&WCD) is supposed to be directed to an area located midway between Lemon Street and Waite Street.

2014 digital exhibit map from RCFC&WFC

2014 digital exhibit map from RCFC&WFC

 

Mirror image of the above map using technology of the time, 1980

Mirror image of the above map using technology of the time, 1980

This course was decided in March of 1982 with the approval of the SEDCO Master Drainage Plan. In July of 2014 a new map shows exactly the same facilities still being proposed. Where are they?

The waters east of the freeway are to be collected at the culverts coming under the freeway an by underground pipe directed to an open channel per this MASTER DRAINAGE PLAN approved in 1982.

First Section explaining Line E, E-1 and E-2

First Section explaining Line E, E-1 and E-2

 

Continuation of description

Continuation of description

Despite the engineers call-out for a direct connection what is currently present directs copious amounts of water onto Lemon Street.

An 18 inch line which directs water from a 66 inch culvert onto Lemon St.

An 18 inch line which directs water from a 66 inch culvert onto Lemon St.

From this collection box which is supposed to be the direct connection called Line E-1 water overflows across yards and onto Lemon Street.

The concrete basin which once filled flows to the above pipe.

The concrete basin which once filled flows to the above pipe.

The above basin has been recently cleaned of sediment.

Outside view of the 66 inch culvert which fills the basin.

Outside view of the 66 inch culvert which fills the basin.

An inside view of the 66 inch culvert. Notice large amounts of sediment ready to move down hill.

An inside view of the 66 inch culvert. Notice large amounts of sediment ready to move down hill.

Caltrans needs to clean this as this box is on their property and the City of Wildomar has not the money to complete this or any other job, like a  smaller line near Windsong Park on Prairie Road. (See previous articles)

The damage done to neighboring property where RCFC&WCD says the direct connection should occur.

The damage done to neighboring property where RCFC&WCD says the direct connection should occur.

Bottom of a basin on the north side of Lemon Street. 50% filled with dirt.

Bottom of a basin on the north side of Lemon Street. 50% filled with dirt.

This is a typical basin in the City of Wildomar, primarily because the County of Riverside never set up a financial mechanism to collect monies for the maintenance of  these basins. The small group of people who insisted Wildomar become a city either never gave this a second thought or just didn’t care.

 

Back to the direct connections, the above 66 inch line is one of two major connecting points. The other is an 84 inch line that doesn’t even have a box to slow things down.

84 inch line located at the end of Hager Street.

84 inch line located at the end of Hager Street.

Which results in a neighbor having to try and protect their property by any means possible.

Seeing the water flow away from this property must be amazing. Picture's don't do it justice.

Seeing the water flowing away from this property must be amazing. Picture’s don’t do it justice.

In between these two large drains is another smaller drain that more than likely doesn’t work.

The State of California like the City of Wildomar does not consider these little things a priority.

The State of California like the City of Wildomar does not consider these little things a priority.

Let us cross under the freeway for a moment to look at a drainage feature connected to Lemon Street from the hills above.

Traveling east

Traveling east

The first picture is the collection basin on the northeast corner of Grape Street and Lemon Street.

Could not get in to measure but looks to be around 48 inches

Could not get in to measure but looks to be around 48 inches

Large amounts of water flow down Lemon Street and some of it makes it into the basin

Looking east from corner of Grape and Lemon Streets.

Looking east from corner of Grape and Lemon Streets.

Some of this water continues under the freeway because it can’t find a drain

A proper Water Quality Control Plan states these drains are to be checked before and after every major storm.

A proper Water Quality Control Plan states these drains are to be checked before and after every major storm.

Then we have channel E-2 which is supposed to collect water from a basin on Lemon Street and direct it to the OPEN CHANNEL between Lemon Street and Waite Street where Loquat Street intersects Lemon Street. What we have instead is one of a series of deflectors that direct water back onto Lemon Street.

One of several of these features.

One of several of these features.

 

This is supposed to be a 10 foot wide channel at Loquat Street

This is supposed to be a 10 foot wide channel at Loquat Street

Its been weeks since the last rains but this is rural Wildomar.

Its been weeks since the last rains but this is rural Wildomar.

 

Of all the facilities that were proclaimed to be necessary in 1982 only the open channel west of Corydon Street has been completed, after years of water pooling and laying stagnant up to the north to Vine Street along Mission Trail. It was completed in 2005 at a cost somewhere north of $500,000.00 for 730 feet of underground storm drain starting at Lemon Street / Mission Trail an ending in 495 linear feet of Open Channel west of Corydon Street, then draining onto the Lake bottom at 1260 feet of elevation.

Drawing from agreement between City of Lake Elsinore and RCFC&WCD in 2009

Drawing from agreement between City of Lake Elsinore and RCFC&WCD in 2009

 

One of three collector boxes at Lemon Street / Mission Trail where water is finally collected.

One of three collector boxes at Lemon Street / Mission Trail where water is finally collected.

This open channel drains the water that flows down Lemon Street once it reaches Mission Trail.

This open channel drains the water that flows down Lemon Street once it reaches Mission Trail.

 

PRAIRIE ROAD DRAINAGE SYSTEM AND ITS REHABILITATION

While everyone in town was running over to Regency Heritage Park taking pictures of the river another disaster was unfolding across town in Wildomar. A Manhole cover was popping up.

Not the actual cover but you get the idea.

Not the actual cover but you get the idea.

This little noticed event occurred on Prairie Road in the Windsong Tract.

This drainage system consist of what is shown as 2 Reinforced Concrete Pipes (RCP), one of these is 5 feet in diameter, that run the length of Praire Road. There are shown to be 7 openings to allow water to enter this system (4 located at the north end, 3 in a dirt field with one as a curb drain) with 2 exit points, located in Windsong Park, that empty into what is referred to as Lateral C by Riverside County Flood Control and Water Conservation District.

Riverside County Flood Control Drawing done October 2013

Riverside County Flood Control Drawing done October 2013

Above I mentioned the words “is shown” because at this point in time the 60 inch line is in the process of being cleaned out. The other has not been located as of yet.

The city was hoping to complete the job using a dustbuster like this one.
Dustbuster

Instead we had to get something a little bigger.

This is the truck that started the job.

This is the truck that started the job.

After opening up the access points it looks like we are going to need something even larger and a lot more money.

This process will take several days as this line has been neglected for approximately 14 years according to neighbors who have lived on the street since purchasing their homes newly built.

This is one opening up the street from the park. It looks to be fairly clean.

This is one opening up the street from the park. It looks to be fairly clean.


This opening at the south end of the park has about 6 inches of daylight. In other words its full of it.

This opening at the south end of the park has about 6 inches of daylight. In other words its full of it.

Full of it equals approximately 1000 linear feet of 56 inch storm drain that is anywhere from 1/2 full at each end to completely full somewhere in the middle. This amounts to anywhere from 8,000 cu. ft. to 17,000 cu. ft. of dirt.

After the clean out a camera will be inserted into this first line in order to ascertain its integrity and soundness. This video process will also determine if the lateral from Raspberry Lane connects to this line or if it is a separate line in its own right.
As the clean out process progresses I will update this post with new pictures, hopefully the city doesn’t run out of money before this one line can be cleaned.

PART ONE IS COMPLETE ? NOW ON TO PART TWO ?

12. PUBLIC NOTIFICATION

10-Day Notifications – Before Contractor begins any work, all residents and businesses on each street affected by the work shall be notified in writing, at least ten (10) calendar days in advance.
This notification will provide general information about the project, approximate range of dates on when construction will take place, time of work, Contractor’s name and phone number and any other pertinent information for residents.
Technical Specification Page 38 (882 of 980 Wildomar City Council Agenda Packet for September 10, 2014)

CAN SOMEONE EXPLAIN WHY WE BOTHERED TO HAVE A CONTRACT

This notice was received by residents on November 14, 2014

This notice was received by residents on November 14, 2014

15 DAYS AFTER THE CRACK SEALING WAS ? (I would like to say completed but that would be a lie)

72-Hour Notifications – The Contractor is responsible for delivering City supplied door hangers (or Contractor’s equivalent form approved by the Engineer) PRIOR to resurfacing operations.
Notification will require dates, times and other pertinent information regarding the project to be filled in by the Contractor and as directed by the Engineer.
The Contractor is responsible for providing a phone number on the notice that can be reached after hours and on weekends by resident and businesses to answer their concerns.
72-Hour Notifications to affected residents and businesses shall be delivered a minimum of 72-hours prior to resurfacing operations.
Technical Specification Page 39 (883 of 980 Wildomar City Council Agenda Packet for September 10, 2014)

13. CLEARING AND GRUBBING

Contractor shall remove all objectionable material from within the area required for resurfacing.
Objectionable material shall include, but not limited to roots, brush, grass, weeds, pavement material and debris and other related materials. Objectionable material shall be removed from the right-of-way and shall be transported and properly disposed of off-site. All cost charges and fees shall be the responsibility of the Contractor.
Technical Specification Page 39 (883 of 980 Wildomar City Council Agenda Packet for September 10, 2014)

Areas such as this can be found all over the streets listed in Appendix B.

Areas such as this can be found all over the streets listed in Appendix B.

20. BASE REPAIR – REMOVE AND REPLACE WITH AC, TYPE A (6” DEPTH)

Base repair areas designated for removal and replacement are listed under “Location of Proposed Improvements” in Appendix B.
(Appendix B is available in a previous post WILDOMAR INSPECT THYSELF)
The contractor shall remove the existing asphalt concrete pavement and underlying base to the depth of six (6) inches, or as directed by the Engineer and backfill the resultant excavation with Asphalt Concrete, Type A.
Technical Specification Page 43 (887 of 980 Wildomar City Council Agenda Packet for September 10, 2014)

In addition to Appendix B the contractor has marked sections of roadway to be repaired before slurry sealing ?

Example of a marked area.

Example of a marked area.

Same road less than 100 feet away in the project area.

Same road less than 100 feet away in the project area.

24. SLURRY SEAL, TYPE II

Preparation of Surface
Immediately prior to applying the slurry, the Contractor shall clean the street surface and lip of gutter joints of all loose material, silt spots, vegetation, and any other matter, which may adversely affect the adherence of the slurry to the existing pavement.

Such a wonderful job was done during the crack sealing phase.

Such a wonderful job was done during the crack sealing phase.

The Contractor shall be responsible for sweeping all streets with a mechanical power broom immediately prior to sealing. The Engineer may require particularly dirty streets to be flushed with water. The Engineer must approve all flushing operations. The Contractor shall be
responsible for cleaning sidewalks and driveways soiled by flushing operations.
Technical Specification Page 50 – 53(894 – 897 of 980 Wildomar City Council Agenda Packet for September 10, 2014)

Placing

The slurry seal shall not be placed when the existing pavement or air temperature is below 55 degrees Fahrenheit (15 degrees C) and falling, or during unsuitable weather, but may be applied when both pavement and air temperature are above 45 degrees Fahrenheit (7 degrees C) and rising.
The joint between the pavement and the PCC gutter shall be sealed with slurry seal.
A straight-line cut-off shall be obtained by laying down a strip of building paper or other approved material. The Contractor shall remove such paper and any excess slurry after application of the slurry. Edge limits of the slurry on both sides of the street shall be maintained
in a neat and uniform line.

NOTHING ELSE IN THIS TOWN IS STRAIGHT SO WHY SHOULD THIS

The Contractor shall be responsible for one (1) sweep approximately one week after placement of slurry seal and final sweep approximately three–four weeks after placement of slurry seal.
Technical Specification Page 54 (898 of 980 Wildomar City Council Agenda Packet for September 10, 2014)

PARKLAND OR COMMUNITY SERVICE AREA

Measure Z Fund or General Fund

Drainage Easement leading into Regency Heritage Park from Trailwood Ct.

Drainage Easement leading into Regency Heritage Park from Trailwood Ct.


This drainage easement which was cleaned out once by the City of Wildomar Public Works Department thru its contract with PV Maintenance, Inc., the company that maintains Wildomar’s streets, sidewalks, storm drains, street lights, and once by Inland Empire Landscaping the company the is contracted to maintain Wildomar’s 3 parks.

Regency Heritage Park ends at the block wall.

Regency Heritage Park ends at the block wall.

In the first years expenditures this channel appears to have been billed to Measure Z Funds with a check made out to PV Maintenance for $4,847.88 this amount include the scraping of channel removing trees, muck, weeds and trash along with scraping off the dog park area.

Tract Map clearly shows drainage channel outside of park.

Tract Map clearly shows drainage channel outside of park.


This channel is approximately 190 feet in length of which only 40 feet is on the property of Regency Heritage Park, the balance of 150 feet rightly belongs to CSA 142 but this is only a lighting district with no provision to pay for drainage and cost should come from the general fund. The area that is parkland, the access road from Autumn Oak Pl, has never been cleaned as this would require the removal of storm drain covers.
This is not parkland

This is not parkland


Another view outside the park

Another view outside the park


Storm drain on Autumn Oak Pl. Measure Z funds or ?

Storm drain on Autumn Oak Pl. Measure Z funds or ?

IT STARTED OUT AS A 5.8 ACRE QUIMBY ACT DEDICATION, WHAT IS IT TODAY?

It is a strip of land approximately 150 ft wide by about 940 ft in length that is dying from a lack of attention.
Even after planting numerous plants (2,881 per the Planting Plan) and then spending almost $10,000 in emergency environmental permits and burrowing owl studies in this park, rebuilding the dog park at a cost of $10,500 for DG and fencing, this parkland has been all but abandoned by the city of Wildomar, excepting the expenditure of $950 for a bronze plaque.
All one has to do is look at the water bills which in the past have been $1452.28 for July of 2009, $1,827.37 in August of 2010, $1,243.18 in October of 2013 and is now down to $87.65 for May to June of 2014 (one month after re-opening the parks).
This parkland started out life in October of 1992 as the second Quimby land dedication, with Windsong Park being the first, in the then Ortega Trail Recreation and Park District. It’s value at the time was put at $237,133 with the improvements such as a park sign, access road, fencing, basketball court and bbq. It was soon determined that of the 5.8 acres accepted, 2.5 acres contained flood control channels. Of the 3.3 acres left a strip approximately 36 feet wide running the entire 940 foot length of the park contains a slope of 11% which exceeds the County of Riverside standard for Quimby donated parkland, the standard being 5% this is exceeded by more than double. Add to this a strip of land approximately 10 feet wide

Current 10 foot wide Channel that runs complete length of the  park

Current 10 foot wide Channel that runs complete length of the park


Sediment Removed?. This channel to be widened to 40 feet x 6 feet in depth. Note the slope to the right, unplayable

Sediment Removed?. This channel to be widened to 40 feet x 6 feet in depth. Note the slope to the right, unplayable


that CURRENTLY contains a concrete lined drainage channel running the entire length and you are left with just less than 2 acres of usable parkland. It was originally determined the developer was only required to donate 1.8 acres of parkland to satisfy their Quimby requirement. Looks like they succeeded.
When the County of Riverside turned over this parkland, after spending several million dollars on renovation, to the City of Wildomar the County failed to turn over, and the City of Wildomar failed to pursue all 5.8 acres of the original dedicated land (Even though city staff told the city council on July 22, 2009 that the county had turned over all of it, Staff Lied). This is a problem because the title to the flood control channel and associated access roads is currently held by the County of Riverside Economic Development Agency (EDA) leaving the maintenance of these channels, access roads and fences in limbo because this agency doesn’t really have a budget for maintenance, just ask the folks in Mead Valley. These flood control channels leading to Palomar and Grand Ave are also ideal for a trail Class One Trail as well as being necessary for the completion of the Murrieta Creek Trail link to Lake Elsinore.
Standing on Grand Ave. looking east towards Regency Heritage Park.

Standing on Grand Ave. looking east towards Regency Heritage Park.


In the channel which is accessed thru broken gate and fence looking back towards Grand Ave. Notice the accumulated debris.

In the channel which is accessed thru broken gate and fence looking back towards Grand Ave. Notice the accumulated debris.


Looking from where Union St. now ends at the channel back towards Grand Ave. Debris waiting to enter the park.

Looking from where Union St. now ends at the channel back towards Grand Ave. Debris waiting to enter the park.


From Union St. looking towards the park.

From Union St. looking towards the park.


CURRENTLY was used to describe the concrete drainage channel because in the Lakeland Village Master Drainage Plan this 10 wide strip is to be widened to 40 feet in width by 6 ft in depth.
This is the proposed new open channel "A" contained in the Lakeland Village Master Drainage Plan DEIR released in January 2014 by Riverside County Flood Control.

This is the proposed new open channel “A” contained in the Lakeland Village Master Drainage Plan DEIR released in January 2014 by Riverside County Flood Control.


The question remains is the widened area to be shared by the slope as well as the flat or is all going to be contained in the flat, narrowing this park even further. When the city manager was asked about this future prospect for this park he feigned ignorance. He has been sent the information on the Lakeland Village Master Drainage Plan.
This new drain will result in the removal of a 15 feet strip running the entire length of the dog park requiring the fence be moved along with the several of the apparatuses recently renovated.
The ends of the PVC pipe are 20 feet from centerline of the existing channel

The ends of the PVC pipe are 20 feet from centerline of the existing channel


Along with narrowing the existing dog park this channel will result in a loss of walkway,
The upright PVC in the can is 20 feet from the centerline of the existing channel near the basketball courts

The upright PVC in the can is 20 feet from the centerline of the existing channel near the basketball courts


the rebuilding of a bridge,
Each black mark is 1 foot, the top of the existing bridge is 2 feet with the bottom at 18 inches. The blue bag is 6 feet, the new depth of the proposed channel.

Each black mark is 1 foot, the top of the existing bridge is 2 feet with the bottom at 18 inches. The blue bag is 6 feet, the new depth of the proposed channel.


The edge of the new channel will extend out to the end of the PVC making it necessary to remove the existing circle at the park along with the existing planter.

The edge of the new channel will extend out to the end of the PVC making it necessary to remove the existing circle at the park along with the existing planter.


the possible loss of a gazebo,
The end of the PVC is 20 feet off the centerline of the existing channel.

The end of the PVC is 20 feet off the centerline of the existing channel.


the moving of numerous existing water lines and irrigation support apparatus.
Existing water valve servicing the parks irrigation system.

Existing water valve servicing the parks irrigation system.


This is an aerial taken by the County of Riverside in 2011 showing the existing channel.

This is an aerial taken by the County of Riverside in 2011 showing the existing channel.


This is the same aerial with the proposed channel whited-out.

This is the same aerial with the proposed channel whited-out.


This impending channel has been proposed in the Lakeland Village Master Drainage Plan which was released to the Public for comments back in January after several years of work being done on it by County Flood Control. Apparently the City of Wildomar only talks to County Flood Control when a developer needs something.
This parkland is in desperate need of a Parks Council to guide its future and the City of Wildomar needs its staff to separate the flood control aspects of it from the Parks and Trails aspects. I wish the Measure Z Oversight Committee all the luck in the world in determining what is expenditures for parks, trails and flood control.
If anyone is interested in reading about the history of the old Ortega Parks District there is a good synopsis at http://www.bsa.ca.gov/pdfs/reports/2002-106.pdf which is the State of California Audit of the district after bankruptcy.
The Lakeland Village Master Drainage Plan can be found at http://www.floodcontrol.co.riverside.ca.us/ bottom of the page under CEQA/Section 18 is the Draft Program EIR for the Lakeland Village MDP it is about 60 megabyte.